Little Jibril can now swim the length of the recreational pool at the Midway YMCA on Saturday mornings. (Photo by Mitchell Lallier)

Little Jibril can now swim the length of the recreational pool at the Midway YMCA on Saturday mornings. (Photo by Mitchell Lallier)

By CAROL MAHNKE

Little eyes brighten and smiles break out when mommy or daddy say it’s time to go to the pool at the Midway YMCA Saturday mornings for swimming lessons for infants and toddlers.Mitch Lallier teaches the classes where little ones get used to the water while their parents learn how to teach the children to swim as well as becoming comfortable with their kids being in the water.
Ken Strike said his child was scared of the pre-swim shower but was delighted with being in the pool.
It’s a noisy class peppered with shrieks of delight and nursery songs like “Old McDonald” and “Hokey Pokey” as Lallier leads children and parents in a circle of movements like ‘put your chin in” and “kick, kick, kick.”
The children range in age from six months to two years.
Occasionally adults from the lap swim pool join in with the songs, and sometimes they even join the circle in the recreational pool.
Many of the little ones hesitate to jump into the pool. Only if a parent’s arms are waiting to catch them will they take the dare.
Not so with little Jibril (last name withheld) who jumps into the water, letting his head go under, almost before his mother can get into position.
Putting faces in the water is a difficult lesson for most of the children, so Lallier has them put in one side of their faces and then the other to get used to the idea
Dominique and Joel Holwaida have a pool at home so they are particularly anxious to make sure little Quinn, seven months, is safe in the water. So far, Dominique said, she loves the water.
Matthias (who withheld his last name) said he appreciates Lallier’s class as it makes both parents and children feel “safe and comfortable” in the water. Mother Lauren is qualified as a lifeguard but appreciates Lallier’s lessons.
They, too, have a pool at home.
Quinn loves the water, Lauren says.
After class parents hurry to get their little ones dry and in clothes before they go out into Minnesota’s early spring.
But even though the children often shiver as they get out of the pool, they are delighted to get back in the water the next week.

Little eyes brighten and smiles break out when mommy or daddy say it’s time to go to the pool at the Midway YMCA Saturday mornings for swimming lessons for infants and toddlers. Mitch Lallier teaches the classes where little ones get used to the water while their parents learn how to teach the children to swim as well as becoming comfortable with their kids being in the water.

Ken Strike said his child was scared of the pre-swim shower but was delighted with being in the pool.

It’s a noisy class peppered with shrieks of delight and nursery songs like “Old McDonald” and “Hokey Pokey” as Lallier leads children and parents in a circle of movements like ‘put your chin in” and “kick, kick, kick.”

The children range in age from six months to two years.

Occasionally adults from the lap swim pool join in with the songs, and sometimes they even join the circle in the recreational pool.

Many of the little ones hesitate to jump into the pool. Only if a parent’s arms are waiting to catch them will they take the dare.

Not so with little Jibril (last name withheld) who jumps into the water, letting his head go under, almost before his mother can get into position.

Putting faces in the water is a difficult lessons for most of the children, so Lallier has them put in one side of their faces and then the other to get used to the idea Dominique and Joel Holwaida have a pool at home so they are particularly anxious to make sure little Quinn, seven months, is safe in the water. So far, Dominique said, she loves the water.

Matthias (who withheld his last name) said he appreciates Lallier’s class as it makes both parents and children feel “safe and comfortable” in the water. Mother Lauren is qualified as a lifeguard but appreciates Lallier’s lessons.

They, too, have a pool at home.

Quinn loves the water, Lauren says.

After class parents hurry to get their little ones dry and in clothes before they go out into Minnesota’s spring.

But even though the children often shiver as they get out of the pool, they are delighted to get back in the water the next week.

Photos by Mitchell Lallier

lifeguard on duty - Kids On The Line Handball and Swimming

The answer is easy we are not training enough persons to be lifeguards. How do we find more lifeguards to meet the needs of our community?

First, we need to reach out and ask current swimming programs to find persons capable of passing the lifeguard screening and then get them in a lifeguard class. Second, we need to teach and train new persons that might not have the skills right now but have an interest in becoming lifeguards. Third we need to reach out to persons that have been lifeguards in the past and ask them to return to help lifeguard.

Kids on the Line wish to help out in all three area to help fill the lifeguard shortage.

ARTICLE - Drowining in Minnesota- It doesn't look like you think it does

DROWNING ACCIDENT ARTICLE DOWNLOAD (PDF)

Again Gary Ales and the Friendship Club turn out to help the Midway YMCA Men’s Club unload Christmas trees to help raise money for the Y programs. Over 50 people showed up the make hard work easy.

The 50 people came from seven high schools (Central, Humboldt, OWL, St. Paul Academy, Visitation, St. Thomas Academy, Eagan High School and four colleges (Concordia Women hockey team, St Kate, St. Paul College, and Inver Hills Community college). Gary said that Nikki Schilling started coming out 15 years ago as a ninth grader at Humboldt High School and now she is a fifth grade supervisor at Bruce Vento School.

When Joseph Lallier (senior at Eagan High School) was asked why he had been doing this for the past four years, he said that beside being fun it was a way a young person could give back to his community. Dave Dominick, the director of the Midway YMCA, was so thankful to all the persons that turned out to help unload the Christmas trees this year.

 

“Leadership in our community comes by being servants to others. To finding a need and filling it, by taking your gifts and sharing them with others, taking what you have plenty of and giving to others. By being active in your community and demanding the best from everyone,” observed Mitchell Lallier. “What a fun way to start the season by giving to others.

Someone brought bell necklaces and wrist bells to ring as they worked. A group broke out singing Jingle Bells and everyone joined in.

 

handball-player

One Wall Handball Celebration

Join your local handball community as we celebrate the completion of a new outdoor handball court in Clayland Park! Experienced players will be there to give a short training session to help teach you about the great sport of handball. Learn a great sport, spend some time outside and meet those in your community.

Where: Clayland Park Saint Paul MN
When: August 14th 1:30-3:00 (reschedule to August 15 if it rains)

USHA NATIONAL FOUR-WALL JUNIORS

Juniors get the final words: Thank you!

Donations open door to a great experience

any juniors are able to travel to USHA national events only because of the generous donations to the
Ardito Travel Fund. Each recipient of travel money writes a letter of appreciation to his or her sponsor. Here are some examples of the juniors’ thoughts on the donors’ generosity:
I’m 16 years old and have been playing handball for 11 years. I’m so thankful that you were able to help support me in coming out to Portland, Ore., for my 10th junior nationals. I look forward to this tournament all year.
I have a brother, mom and dad who all play handball, as it has turned into a family affair. Sometimes all four of us will play in tournaments together. I started playing handball at the Lattof YMCA with Don Quinlan’s group and I’ve loved it ever since. This past year I have started to play in the open brackets at tournaments around the Midwest.
Once again, I would like to thank you for your help and support as it means more to me than you could think.
Ray Ure, Des Plaines, Ill.

I am 9 years old and the youngest player in the juniors tournament. I have been playing handball for one year.
My granddad is my coach. We practice three times a week. Bob Hickman teaches a class on Saturdays.
I want to have fun and win more games. My goal is to be the best handball player possible. My life goal is to get good grades and be the best person I can be.
Joshua Smith, Colorado Springs

I’m from Ireland, and this is my first time being at the junior nationals. I’m playing in the 19-and-under division in singles and doubles. I started playing handball at 14 and haven’t looked back since.

Being here has been a great experience, especially seeing all the players America and Canada have to offer. I’ve also made new friends and broadened my handball horizons.

I cannot thank you enough for helping fund and run this tournament as it really is the best junior tournament I’ve been to. It has improved my game tenfold. The chance to participate somewhere like the MAC really is a dream come true.

Thank you again and hopefully someday
I’ll do the same.
Brooklyn Hickey, Mallow, Ireland

2018-jrs-awards-700

Isaac Alberg (left) won the award for most improved, named for Lattof YMCA players Kate Conlon and Kurt Johannson, and Joseph Lallier earned the sportsmanship award, named after Vince Gabriele Jr. Alberg, in only his second year, became one of the most competitive juniors, and Lallier pitched in whenever help was needed.

a.j.wilkinson

A.J. Wilkinson, who won a title in his first USHA event, receives the best newcomer honor from LeaAnn Martin. The award is named for Tom Lynch, who has spearheaded fundraising for the annual juniors travel awards.

A.J. Wilkinson, who won a title in his first USHA event, receives the best newcomer honor from LeaAnn Martin. The award is named for Tom Lynch, who has spearheaded fundraising for the annual juniors travel awards.

I am 13 and have been playing handball for about two years. This is my second nationals. I play handball, tennis, soccer, volleyball and track and field. I am a triplet and have two sisters who also play handball.
I play handball at the Lattof YMCA and my coach is Don Quinlan. I play handball one day a week for two hours a day, sometimes three.
Thank you so much for your generosity. I really appreciate it.
Zoe Klicker, Arlington Heights, Ill.

I want to thank you for helping us come to Portland, Ore. I had a great time here and wish to come again.
I’ve been playing handball for five years now, and ever since I returned my first shot in the short court I fell in love with it. I am
13 now, and I participated in the 13-and- under small-ball bracket. I won two games and sadly lost two.
I’m glad I lost because I learn from my losses. I’m ready for the 2019 nationals and thankful for you.
Antonio Rivera, Tucson

I am 12 years old and have been playing handball for seven years. I like handball because it keeps you in shape and it’s fun to play.
I appreciate you for supporting me because it has helped me be where I am now. And without you I wouldn’t be able to go on big trips like Portland, Ore., and Chicago. Thank you for your donations and supporting the Fred Lewis Foundation.
Ayden Brule, Tucson

HANDBALL 23

Steve Kufus handball tourney 2019

Steve Kufus who has given time to help teach, moral support and financial support to the Minnesota Youth Handball Community was awarded the tournament name this year. Steve was recognized as a person that has given a lot to promote handball in Minnesota.

The Midway YMCA has a program called Court Sports where handball, racquetball and wolleyball is taught. This years Minnesota State Handball 2019 tournament was held at the University of Minnesota. Ayan Hassan, an 11-year-old from Friends School won the 2 bounce Youth Handball Tournament.

This year the Youth Handball Program group taught 40 to 50 young adults (from eight different countries). Mitchell Lallier, along with the older players, worked with the younger players (5-12) while Phil Gebben Green, along with the University of Minnesota students, worked with the older players. to learn the value of playing handball. They teach not only handball but leadership, responsibility, honesty, friendship, and sportsmanship.

Story taken from The Monitor

Midway YMCA has always been a hotbed for Handball. A few key long time handball players Gary Aeles, Rich Ryan, Emanuel Woods, Ray Miller, Greg Taylor, Ted Bergstrom ( 83 years young) and all the other handball players have helped build a new group of young handball players at the Y.

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